Book Review: ‘Another Now’ by Yanis Varoufakis

Another Now: Dispatches from an Alternative Present by Yanis Varoufakis

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

In 2025 idealistic tech whizz-kid Costa, in the course of developing the ultimate Virtual Reality machine, stumbles upon a portal into an alternative present-day in which the financial crash of 2008 gave rise, not to the enrichment of the banking sector as it did in our timeline, but to its total demise and the transformation of the world economy into something approaching a dynamic but egalitarian utopia.

Land and utilities are collectivised, companies are assessed (and annually vetted on pain of dissolution) for their contribution to the public good, and everyone receives a savings pot at birth and a basic income throughout life.

Delighted at his find, but terrified that his VR creation may fall into commercial hands and be used to render everyone an impoverished addict (instead of the noble purpose for which he intends it), Costa invites two trusted friends, former financier Eva and Anarchist firebrand Iris, to share in what he has found.

In scenes reminiscent of Dialogues from Plato, the three friends correspond with their counterparts in the ‘Other Now’ through the data-limited portal. Their questions on how the other economy is run, together with how it came about, are answered with a realistic sequence of events depicting its foundations and early days, and a full explanation of all its workings. The history struck a chord because the same mechanism has come into play just recently – a year after this book was written!

The ‘Other Now’ is a fully-fleshed-out, detailed scenario written by a professional: Yanis Varoufakis is a Professor of Economics and was the Syriza government’s Minister of Finance in Greece in 2015.

It’s worth noting that the book’s jacket identifies it as ‘Economics’ – not ‘Science Fiction’.

The reading is heavy going at times if you’re not an Economics or Politics enthusiast. It’s also difficult to be able to tell – again if you’re not well-up on economic or political history – whether events could unfold like this in real life without either being overpowered by our present Establishment, or else veering off in some other path. But as an economics not-quite-ignoramus, and someone who has taken a small but active part in politics, I can at least say that it is self-consistent, and not beyond the bounds of the possible.

At this point the reader may pause and think, well that’s that then – here’s our (Plato-style) Ideal economy in which everybody gets to realise something of their true selves without the threat of immiseration with which we, in ‘Our Now’, constantly have to deal.

But there’s a flaw, spotted by Iris. Perhaps some of society’s problems are insoluble – at least by Economics alone…

I loved this book. I love the way it draws upon everything from Greek philosophy and myth (disclaimer: no prior knowledge of these is assumed – everything is beautifully explained) through present-day political economy to my own Alma Mater the University of Sussex – and literally in the years that I was there!

I particularly love the twist in the closing chapters. I kick myself now, that I didn’t see it coming. But drawing on the tale of Gyges’ Ring and the question of what you would do if you had ultimate power (and what the result would in turn do to you), it asks, ‘Would you step into a world in which you had absolute power – all bar the power to leave?’




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