North York Moors, Saxon church, and sundial

“I want to drag you all out for a walk.”

Nobody reacted.

“There’s a Sundial.”

It also has to be said that the temperature had finally reached the upper realms of single figures, and the weeks-long gruesome wind had died down; so off we all went.

The Moors are heather and peat, and sparsely inhabited. At night, they offer some of England’s darkest skies.

The milestone here was put up in 2000. We sat for a bit of a rest and noticed the lamb near the sheep on the left there wasn’t moving – the sheep kept returning to it hoping for better luck each time. Eventually the lamb got up on shaky legs and started to feed. Life isn’t always easy.

This hole i’th wall was Lastingham’s village well.

Lastingham village.

The land for Lastingham Church was originally consacrated by St Cedd, who also took part in the Synod of Whitby (which, among other things, set out how the date for Easter is calculated.)

Cedd died of the Plague in 664. Of a party of monks who travelled all the way from Essex to mourn him, all bar one met the same fate. What with that and the Saxon crypt, the church is kind-of Metal…

The village, under the moors. Ever noticed how it’s the most recently-built houses in Northern villages that have the best views? The older ones nestle to keep out of the wind – and their inhabitants would probably have had enough of the Great Outdoors by the time the working day comes to an end!

Vintage postbox (Note ‘V : R’ embossed at the top!)

We now come to one of the flatter parts of Yorkshire…

…which led us, finally, to Kirkdale, and the 11th century sundial whose inscription mentions not only Edward (‘the Confessor’) but also Tostig, at that time Earl of Northumbria. Tostig’s later support of Harald Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge contributed to King Harold’s defeat at Hastings in the same year.

In the wake of that battle, and wanting to stamp out any possibility of Northern rebellion, William I sent mercenaries north. They exterminated three quarters of the population here.

Like I said – dark skies.

Last walk of 2020

It’s been a long year.

Here it is in close-up:

Sometimes it felt like struggling through tangled branches…

Or going through odd places, seeing things from a different angle:

It seemed to go on and on…

Until the last sunset

In the absence of the promised New Year’s Eve party – cancelled due to tightening restrictions (York got moved to Tier 3) – our walk south of the city was the perfect send-off.

Goodnight, 2020. A weird, cruel and thought-provoking year.